Top 10 reasons Hashimoto’s patients don’t get better There is not one easy fix to successfully managing Hashimoto’s hypothyroidism, an autoimmune thyroid disease. For Hashimotos patients to truly manage their autoimmune Hashimoto’s hypothyroidism, it’s important to understand the factors that contribute to it. Immune Reacting 13 reasons why book pdf in Thyroid Hormone Replacement Many thyroid supplements use corn starch or modified food starch that contains gluten. You need to make sure your thyroid hormones are gluten-free and free of corn starch if you react to corn.

If your medication is in capsules make sure the capsules are gluten-free. Otherwise you could be taking hormones every day with dietary proteins that stimulate your autoimmunity. Supplements such as echinacea, green tea, acai, astragalus, licorice, and a variety others. If you are unaware of this you may be taking supplements that promote an autoimmune response.

Unfortunately, Hashimoto’s hypothyroidism is a complex autoimmune disorder and thyroid hormone replacement is only one part of a large puzzle. Increasing Stress Emotional stress activates pathways involving the inflammatory immune messengers IL-6 and TH-17. This activity creates an autoimmune flare-up. Unhealthy relationships with your spouse, co-workers, or friends can promote autoimmune flare-ups, as can a bad work environment, or other significant and chronic lifestyle stressors. If you have Hashimoto’s you need to create a healthy emotional environment for yourself. Not Strictly Gluten-Free You are either 100 percent gluten-free or you’re not gluten-free. Choosing to eat gluten-free only when it is convenient is not a gluten-free diet.

If you are not strict about your food being 100 percent gluten-free when you eat out and you continue to consume condiments that have gluten, regular beer, and foods fried in fryers that use the same oil for breaded foods, then you are still being exposed to gluten. Not avoiding gluten cross-reactive foods Although a strict gluten-free diet is a great place to start, if you are still eating foods that cross-react with gluten you may not recover well. Cross-reactive foods have proteins similar in structure to gluten and can trigger the same immune response as if you were eating gluten. Ignoring their brain health The most common form of collateral damage in chronic Hashimoto’s patients is accelerated brain degeneration. Brain degeneration leads to identical symptoms of hypothyroidism, including fatigue and depression.

I strongly suggest all thyroid patients become experts in identifying and supporting their brain health by referring to my second book, Why Isn’t My Brain Working? TH-17 activity, which promotes autoimmune flare-ups. Eating sweets throughout the day or overeating promotes insulin surges, which can be identified by symptoms of fatigue or sugar cravings immediately after eating. Missing meals When blood sugar gets too low it raises the inflammatory messenger IL-6 and promotes autoimmune flare-ups. Symptoms of low blood sugar are most noticeable between meals or if you skip meals and include shakiness, blurred vision, crankiness and irritability, and loss of function.

If you feel a jump in your function and energy after eating it confirms your blood sugar was low—when your blood sugar is stable the only thing you should feel after eating is not hungry. Passive attitude The passive patient does not question or challenge her doctor. If you are a passive Hashimoto’s patient and you do not take your health into your own hands you may not fare as well as the person who educates herself. The conventional model is based only on lowering your TSH with whatever thyroid medication your insurance plan or doctor prefers. Once TSH is within lab ranges, this model has nothing more to offer except to check your TSH once a year.