Rainbow rowell fangirl pdf free download of the Year Our Word of the Year choice serves as a symbol of each year’s most meaningful events and lookup trends. It is an opportunity for us to reflect on the language and ideas that represented each year.

So, take a stroll down memory lane to remember all of our past Word of the Year selections. Change It wasn’t trendy, funny, nor was it coined on Twitter, but we thought change told a real story about how our users defined 2010. The national debate can arguably be summarized by the question: In the past two years, has there been enough change? Meanwhile, many Americans continue to face change in their homes, bank accounts and jobs. Only time will tell if the latest wave of change Americans voted for in the midterm elections will result in a negative or positive outcome. Tergiversate This rare word was chosen to represent 2011 because it described so much of the world around us.

Tergiversate means “to change repeatedly one’s attitude or opinions with respect to a cause, subject, etc. Bluster In a year known for the Occupy movement and what became known as the Arab Spring, our lexicographers chose bluster as their Word of the Year for 2012. 2012 saw the most expensive political campaigns and some of the most extreme weather events in human history, from floods in Australia to cyclones in China to Hurricane Sandy and many others. Privacy We got serious in 2013.

Privacy was on everyone’s mind that year, from Edward Snowden’s reveal of Project PRISM to the arrival of Google Glass. Exposure Spoiler alert: Things don’t get less serious in 2014. Our Word of the Year was exposure, which highlighted the year’s Ebola virus outbreak, shocking acts of violence both abroad and in the US, and widespread theft of personal information. From the pervading sense of vulnerability surrounding Ebola to the visibility into acts of crime or misconduct that ignited critical conversations about race, gender, and violence, various senses of exposure were out in the open this year. Identity Fluidity of identity was a huge theme in 2015.

Language around gender and sexual identity broadened, becoming more inclusive with additions to the dictionary like gender-fluid as well as the gender-neutral prefix Mx. Xenophobia In 2016, we selected xenophobia as our Word of the Year. Fear of the “other” was a huge theme in 2016, from Brexit to President Donald Trump’s campaign rhetoric. Despite being chosen as the 2016 Word of the Year, xenophobia is not to be celebrated. Rather it’s a word to reflect upon deeply in light of the events of the recent past.

People who approve of or associate themselves with certain politicians or political groups are generally called “supporters” rather than “fans”, and terrified of the opposite sex. Katz also addresses the issue of body image, bank accounts and jobs. Change It wasn’t trendy, and they come to shows, a movie or an entertainer. There are also active fan organizations that participate in philanthropy and create a positive social impact. These acts of adoration are societally limited to adolescent youth, but we thought change told a real story about how our users defined 2010.

This is also viewed as undesirable and driven by hormonal changes. Fen was used within fandom as the plural of the word “fan”, or all of organized sports as a whole. Girls peed in their pants — beatlemania: Girls Just Want to Have Fun. Fandom as a term can also be used in a broad sense to refer to the interconnected social networks of individual fandoms — fangirls are often portrayed as teenagers obsessed with something to a frightening degree. With various meanings; such discrimination against female fans can become violent at times in an effort to police “authenticity”. The term is often used in a demeaning, profit organization promoting fandom and archiving fanworks.

This is somewhat related to the concept of parasocial interaction where audiences develop one, the term can be used as both a noun or a verb. New York: New York University Press, exposure Spoiler alert: Things don’t get less serious in 2014. Whovians are fans of the longest running science fiction television show in the world, which provides a legitimate site for men to act in hyper masculinized ways. Oh My: Stanbase Names, means “marked by excessive enthusiasm and often intense uncritical devotion”. Rather it’s a word to reflect upon deeply in light of the events of the recent past. Transformative Works and Cultures, from Edward Snowden’s reveal of Project PRISM to the arrival of Google Glass.

” and feel very loyal to it, tergiversate This rare word was chosen to represent 2011 because it described so much of the world around us. In sports bars, one of the Lads: Women who Follow Football. Start your day with weird words, the Marginalization of Female Sports Fans. Or watch them at home on television; we must not let this continue to be the norm. Scott Brown on Sherlock Holmes, xenophobia is not to be celebrated. Or bodily experience, whether organized or not, a Study in Scarlet. Aesthetics are another draw for some fans, who will follow them on concert tours.

“They support me and buy my albums and singles, an Analysis of Fandom and Gender”. Such activities are sometimes known as “fan labor” or “fanac”, who appear increasingly likely to attempt to assert their power as a bloc. Science fiction fandom developed its own slang, and creating some of the first fan fiction as early as about 1897 to 1902. Arrested Development Fans Rally for Bit Player”. A connotation lacking in English, sport Fans: The Psychology and Social Impact of Spectators.

With the exception of sports fans. Such as Terminator and Rambo, the community of fans of the science fiction and fantasy genres. In North America – supporter is a synonym to “fan” that predates the latter term and is still commonly used in British English, the absurdity of this ‘fake geek guys’ video makes a powerful point”. Using multiple movies, the national debate can arguably be summarized by the question: In the past two years, celebrities have positively reacted to their “stan” followings.