Beutner emerges as a top pick for L. Some Republican lawmakers, once susan elizabeth phillips books free pdf download of marijuana, now think highly of it. He brought world attention to his sinking island nation.

Kung Fu Kenny, King Kunta, K-Dot. Pixar Fest is under way at Disney theme parks. I know they are going to die. Put California in your inbox with our newsletter. Get Jonathan Gold’s 101 Best Restaurants on your phone. You deserve the truth, and we are here to fight for you.

Colin Kaepernick could have an endorsement deal with Adidas. What exactly is Trump’s message to Syria? Susan Elizabeth Phillip contemporary romance author. Phillips was born on December 11 in Cincinnati, Ohio to John Aller Titus and Louesa Coate Titus. In 1976, the family moved from Ohio to New Jersey. There Phillips and her neighbor, Claire Lefkowitz, often discussed the books they liked to read. Together they wrote a historical romance, The Copeland Bride, which was published in 1983 under the pen name Justine Cole.

After Claire and her family moved, Phillips began writing by herself. Phillips and her husband, Bill, met on a blind date while in college. They have two grown sons, and live in Chicago, Illinois. Phillips is the only five-time winner of the Romance Writers of America Favorite Book of the Year Award. Barnes and Noble Profile of Susan E.

This page was last edited on 9 February 2018, at 04:35. For other uses, see Susan B. American social reformer and women’s rights activist who played a pivotal role in the women’s suffrage movement. In 1851, she met Elizabeth Cady Stanton, who became her lifelong friend and co-worker in social reform activities, primarily in the field of women’s rights.

In 1872, Anthony was arrested for voting in her hometown of Rochester, New York, and convicted in a widely publicized trial. Although she refused to pay the fine, the authorities declined to take further action. In 1878, Anthony and Stanton arranged for Congress to be presented with an amendment giving women the right to vote. Anthony traveled extensively in support of women’s suffrage, giving as many as 75 to 100 speeches per year and working on many state campaigns. She worked internationally for women’s rights, playing a key role in creating the International Council of Women, which is still active. When she first began campaigning for women’s rights, Anthony was harshly ridiculed and accused of trying to destroy the institution of marriage. Public perception of her changed radically during her lifetime, however.

She became the first actual woman to be depicted on U. Susan Brownell Anthony was born on February 15, 1820, to Daniel Anthony and Lucy Read in Adams, Massachusetts, the second oldest of seven children. Her family shared a passion for social reform. Anthony’s father was an abolitionist and a temperance advocate. When Anthony was six years old, her family moved to Battenville, New York, where her father managed a large cotton mill. Previously he had operated his own small cotton factory.

When she was seventeen, Anthony was sent to a Quaker boarding school in Philadelphia, where she unhappily endured its severe atmosphere. In 1845, the family moved to a farm on the outskirts of Rochester, New York, purchased partly with the inheritance of Anthony’s mother. There they associated with a group of Quaker social reformers who had left their congregation because of the restrictions it placed on reform activities, and who in 1848 formed a new organization called the Congregational Friends. As several others in that group were already doing, the Anthony family began to attend services at the First Unitarian Church of Rochester, which was associated with social reform. Anthony did not take part in either of these conventions because she had moved to Canajoharie in 1846 to be headmistress of the female department of the Canajoharie Academy. Away from Quaker influences for the first time in her life, at the age of 26 she began to replace her plain clothing with more stylish dresses, and she quit using “thee” and other forms of speech traditionally used by Quakers.

When the Canajoharie Academy closed in 1849, Anthony took over the operation of the family farm in Rochester so her father could devote more time to his insurance business. She worked at this task for a couple of years but found herself increasingly drawn to reform activity. With her parents’ support, she was soon fully engaged in reform work. Cautious, careful people, always casting about to preserve their reputation and social standing, never can bring about a reform.

Anthony embarked on her career of social reform with energy and determination. Schooling herself in reform issues, she found herself drawn to the more radical ideas of people like William Lloyd Garrison, George Thompson and Elizabeth Cady Stanton. In 1851, Anthony was introduced to Elizabeth Cady Stanton, who had been one of the organizers of the Seneca Falls Convention and had introduced the controversial resolution in support of women’s suffrage. The two women had complementary skills. Anthony excelled at organizing, while Stanton had an aptitude for intellectual matters and writing.

Anthony was dissatisfied with her own writing ability and wrote relatively little for publication. When historians illustrate her thoughts with direct quotes, they usually take them from her speeches, letters and diary entries. Because Stanton was homebound with seven children while Anthony was unmarried and free to travel, Anthony assisted Stanton by supervising her children while Stanton wrote. One of Anthony’s biographers said, “Susan became one of the family and was almost another mother to Mrs.