The wind in the willows book pdf material may be challenged and removed. The band broke up shortly after failing to achieve commercial success or critical acclaim.

Wind in the Willows recorded a second album, which was never released. The whereabouts of the tapes are unknown. According to Cathay Che’s biography on Harry, it has never surfaced, but Harry was said to have contributed more vocals than on the first album, as well as writing lyrics for a track entitled “Buried Treasure” on the second album. UK, Canada, Australia, Brazil, and Germany.

Fallout Record label in the UK. Paul Klein, Peter Brittain, and F. This single was released in the U. Canada, Italy, New Zealand, Brazil, Australia, and Japan. This single was released in the UK and West Germany.

This page was last edited on 30 May 2017, at 11:10. Alastair into a manuscript for the book. There they lived in a spacious but dilapidated home, “The Mount”, in extensive grounds by the River Thames, and were introduced to the riverside and boating by their uncle, David Ingles, curate at Cookham Dean church. During his early years at St. River Thames, and the nearby countryside. When Alastair was about four years old, Grahame would tell him bedtime stories, some of which were about a toad, and when he holidayed alone he would write further tales of Toad, Mole, Ratty and Badger in letters to Alastair. With the arrival of spring and fine weather outside, the good-natured Mole loses patience with spring cleaning.

He flees his underground home, emerging to take in the air and ends up at the river, which he has never seen before. Rat takes Mole for a ride in his rowing boat. They get along well and spend many more days boating, with Rat teaching Mole the ways of the river. One summer day, Rat and Mole disembark near the grand Toad Hall and pay a visit to Toad.

Having recently given up boating, Toad’s current craze is his horse-drawn caravan. He persuades the reluctant Rat and willing Mole to join him on a trip. Toad soon tires of the realities of camp life, and sleeps in the following day to avoid chores. Rat threatens to have the law on the car driver, while Mole calms the horse, but Toad’s craze for caravan travel is immediately replaced by an obsession with motorcars. Mole wants to meet the respected but elusive Badger, who lives deep in the Wild Wood, but Rat—knowing that Badger does not appreciate visits—tells Mole to be patient and wait for Badger to pay them a visit himself.

Nevertheless, on a snowy winter’s day, while the seasonally somnolent Rat dozes, Mole impulsively goes to the Wild Wood to explore, hoping to meet Badger. He gets lost in the woods, sees many “evil faces” among the wood’s less-welcoming denizens, succumbs to fright and panic and hides, trying to stay warm, among the sheltering roots of a tree. Rat, finding Mole gone, guesses his mission from the direction of Mole’s tracks and, equipping himself with two pistols and a stout cudgel, goes in search, finding him as snow begins to fall in earnest. Attempting to find their way home, Rat and Mole quite literally stumble across Badger’s home—Mole barks his shin on the boot scraper on Badger’s doorstep. Badger—en route to bed in his dressing-gown and slippers—nonetheless warmly welcomes Rat and Mole to his large and cozy underground home, providing them with hot food, dry clothes and reassuring conversation – ” It takes all sorts to make a world “.

Badger learns from his visitors that Toad has crashed seven cars, has been in hospital three times, and has spent a fortune on fines. With the arrival of spring, Badger visits Mole and Rat to take action over Toad’s self-destructive obsession. The three of them go to Toad Hall, and Badger tries talking Toad out of his behaviour, to no avail. Badger and Mole are cross with Rat for his gullibility, but draw comfort because they need no longer waste their summer guarding Toad.

However, Badger and Mole continue to live in Toad Hall in the hope that Toad may return. Meanwhile, Toad orders lunch at The Red Lion Inn, and then sees a motorcar pull into the courtyard. Taking the car, he drives it recklessly and is caught by the police. He is sent to prison for 20 years. In prison, Toad gains the sympathy of the gaoler’s daughter, who helps him to escape disguised as a washerwoman. Though free again, Toad is without money or possessions other than the clothes upon his back.

He manages to board a railway engine manned by a sympathetic driver, which is then pursued by a special train loaded with policemen, detectives and prison warders. The barge’s female owner offers him a lift in exchange for Toad’s services as a washerwoman. After botching the wash, Toad gets into a fight with the barge-woman, who tosses him into the canal. Toad subsequently flags down a passing car, which happens to be the very one he stole earlier.

The car owners, not recognising Toad in his disguise, permit him to drive their car. Once behind the wheel, he is repossessed by his former passion and drives furiously, declaring his true identity to the passengers who try to seize him. Pursued by police, he runs accidentally into a river, which carries him by sheer chance to the house of Rat. Wild Wood, who have driven out Mole and Badger. Although upset at the loss of his house, Toad realises what good friends he has and how badly he has behaved. Badger then arrives and announces that he knows of a secret tunnel into Toad Hall through which the enemies may be attacked. Armed to the teeth, Badger, Rat, Mole and Toad enter via the tunnel and pounce upon the unsuspecting Wild Wooders who are holding a celebratory party.